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Abstract Detail


Evolution of Development and Physiology

Wu, Chun-Hsien [1], Wang, Chun-Neng [2].

The expression pattern of floral symmetry genes in relation to floral morphology in Conandron ramondioides (Gesneriaceae).

Most Gesneriaceae species have flowers with bilateral symmetry. But Conandron ramondioides has reverted to radial symmetry. Early study in Antirrhinum majus, four genes, CYCLOIDEA (CYC), DICHOTOMA (DICH), RADIALIS (RAD) and DIVARICATA(DIV), were found to control floral symmetry. In other Gesneriaceae plant, Saintpaulia ionantha, our lab has found CYC-like genes specifically expressed in dorsal petals but not in ventral petal as the situation as in A. majus. In C. ramondioides, we found three CYC-like, one RAD-like and one DIV-like genes. Expression of the genes in different floral stages has been examined via RT-PCR. The result show CrCYC1, CrCYC2, CrCYC3 and CrDIV has expressed in floral buds. However, further examination of their exact expression position within the floral bud will be investigated via northern blotting and in-situ hybridization. By doing so, we shall be able to figure out the mechanism of reverted radial symmetry in C. ramondioides.


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1 - National Taiwan University, Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Room 1207, Life science building, No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei, Taiwan, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan
2 - National Taiwan University., Department of Life Science

Keywords:
cycloidea
floral symmetry.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P27009
Abstract ID:788


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