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Abstract Detail


Ecophysiology

Smith, Marian [1], Capelle, Janice [2].

An ecophysiological study of stem and leaf characteristics in Cichorium intybus (chicory), a common roadside perennial.

Cichorium intybus L. (Asteraceae) is a green-stemmed cosmopolitan weed that occurs along roadsides and in open waste ground. Although considerable research has been conducted in Europe on the growth and production of various chicory cultivars, which are considered edible greens, no ecophysiological studies have examined the proportional contribution of stems and leaves to carbon gain throughout the growing season. From May August, we determined chlorophyll concentrations, mean stem and leaf temperatures, water potential, and all photosynthetic gas exchange parameters on plants in the field. As rosette leaves senesced in early summer, the proportional surface area of stems increased. Throughout the season, stem temperatures were lower and water potential was higher than in leaves. Chlorophyll content was higher in leaves than in stems; however, maximum photosynthesis, on an area basis, was consistently higher in stems than in leaves. It was concluded that photosynthetic stems contribute a significant portion of seasonal carbon gain in chicory.


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1 - Southern Illinois University, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 1651, Edwardsville, Illinois, 62026-1651, USA
2 - Southern Illinois University, Department of Biological Sciences, Box 1651, Edwardsville, Illinois, 62026-1651, USA

Keywords:
Cichorium intybus
chicory
gas exchange
seasonal carbon gain
stem and leaf characteristics.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: CP28
Location: Stevens 1/Hilton
Date: Tuesday, July 10th, 2007
Time: 8:30 AM
Number: CP28001
Abstract ID:433


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