Unable to connect to database - 12:24:54 Unable to connect to database - 12:24:54 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 12:24:54 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 12:24:54 Botany & Plant Biology 2007 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 12:24:54 Unable to connect to database - 12:24:54 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 12:24:54

Abstract Detail


Salinity

Price, Jillian [1], Farcasanu, Illeana [2], Jardine, Jim [1], Dominy, Peter [3].

An Arabidopsis MYB Transcription Factor Confers Tolerance of Salinity and Other Abiotic Stresses.

A gain-of-function screen for salt tolerance using activation tagged lines of Arabidopsis germinated and grown on physiologically significantly levels of K and Ca has identified several interesting mutants. These lines have now been well characterized and shown to carry a dominant mutation arising from gene activation. It has now been confirmed the disrupted gene in three of these lines does indeed play a role in salt tolerance, providing confidence in our experimental approach. The T-DNA insertion in one of these lines is located ~1.3 kbp upstream of a gene encoding a MYB transcription factor that is activated when plants are exposed to salinity. Transgenic lines were made using two constructs: a 35S-promoter driving the MYB gene: a genomic fragment containing the MYB gene and its endogenous promoter fused downstream of 4x 35S-enhancer elements. Experiments showed both constructs conferred salt tolerance when plants were assessed on solid media or soil. Nutrient ion profiling of plants exposed to salinity showed the transgenic lines accumulated only one-fifth of the shoot Na levels found in wild type lines, and their corresponding K/Na ratios were significantly increased. Microarray and confirmatory PCR experiments on salt stressed plants have indicated the transcripts of several small heat shock proteins are upregulated in the MYB over expressing lines. Further experiments have indicated these transgenic lines are more thermotolerant than wild type lines, and early indications suggest increased tolerance of freezing temperatures and drought. These data will be presented in full, and the possible role of this MYB in general abiotic stress signalling will be considered.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - University of Glasgow, Institute of Biomedical & Life Sciences
2 - University of Bucharest, Romania, Department of Chemistry
3 - University of Glasgow, Institute of Biomedical & Life Sciences, Bower Building, Division of Biochemitry & Molecular Biology, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK

Keywords:
salinity
MYB
Abiotic
salt stress
Tolerance
transcription factor.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P07006
Abstract ID:290


Copyright 2000-2007, Botanical Society of America. All rights