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Abstract Detail


Developmental and Structural Section

Sreekanta, Suma [1], Gladish, Daniel, K. [2].

Vascular cavity formation caused by programmed cell death in response hypoxic stress in roots of Pisum sativum.

Pisum sativum is a cool season legume, which under warm conditions and sudden flooding causes lysigenous, gas-filled cavities in the central xylem of their primary roots called vascular aerenchyma. Very little is known about biochemical and molecular processes leading to the formation of these structures. Results from transmission electron microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) indicate that the aerenchyma formation in Pisum sativum could be a result of programmed cell death. Caspase-like enzymes, also called vacuolar processing enzymes (VPE), are known to participate in cell death and hypersensitivity responses in plants. Our study is investigating if caspase-like enzymes have a role in PCD-induced vascular cavity formation in Pisum sativum under stress. Towards this end, caspase inhibition assays using caspase inhibitors will be used. Caspase activity will also be quantified by using fluorometric assays.


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1 - Miami University, Botany Department, 316 Pearson Hall, Oxford, Ohio, 45056, USA
2 - Miami University, Botany, 544, Mosler Hall, Hamilton, Ohio, 45011, USA

Keywords:
Vascular cavity
Aerenchyma
Programmed Cell Death
Caspase-like
Vacuolar processing enzymes
Pisum sativum
hypoxic stress.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P48006
Abstract ID:2309


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