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Abstract Detail


Cell Walls

Trager, Evan [1], Kaplinsky, Nick [2].

SAWFISH1 (SFS1) is a microtubule associated protein required for normal development in Arabidopsis.

SAWFISH1 (SFS1) is a protein with a novel domain architecture consisting of multiple armadillo domains and a carboxyl-terminus C2 domain. C2 domains have been demonstrated to be involved in Ca++ dependent membrane binding as well as protein-protein interactions in other systems. In order to determine the sub-cellular localization of SFS1 we constructed a GFP fusion to the C-terminal region of SFS1, including the C2 domain. Multiple independent transformants of GFP:SFS1 localized to the microtubule cytoskeleton indicating that SFS1 is a microtubule associated protein. Four T-DNA insertion alleles of SFS1 fail to complement each other and exhibit pleiotropic phenotypes. sfs1 mutant plants are significantly shorter, exhibit reduced apical dominance, have disrupted phyllotaxy, and have reduced hypocotyl elongation compared to wild-type plants. Microarray data indicates that SFS1 is highly co-regulated with several genes involved in cell wall biosynthesis. This has led to the working hypothesis that SFS1 may be involved in primary cell wall biosynthesis.


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1 - Swarthmore College, Biology, 500 College Avenue, Swarthmore, PA, 19081, USA
2 - Swarthmore College, Biology

Keywords:
microtubule
CesA
planar phyllotaxy.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P17043
Abstract ID:2203


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