Unable to connect to database - 08:06:14 Unable to connect to database - 08:06:14 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 08:06:14 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 08:06:14 Botany & Plant Biology 2007 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 08:06:14 Unable to connect to database - 08:06:14 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 08:06:14

Abstract Detail


Temperature Responses

Nveainiah Yoho, Peter [1], Zhou, Suping [2], Bhatti, Sarabjit [3].

Identification of heat tolerance genes from Burmuda grass varieties using cDNA differential display and cyanine-labeled fluorescence Dot Blot.

Turfgrass is the major plant species that covers exposed lands in urban and suburban areas in the United States. Different varieties have been commercially bred specifically for heat and cold tolerance, but, no varieties are resistant to both temperature extremes. The Burmuda (Cynodon dactylon) grass varieties are heat tolerant, but they do not perform well under temperature below 59 F (15C). The cold tolerant varieties, such as Kentucky Blue (Poa pratensis), can survive winter, but they will die back during the summer when temperature exceeds 75F (24°C). Classical breeding techniques cannot be used to combine these two traits from the two types of grasses due to the interspecies barrier. This study was undertaken to isolate genes that confer the heat tolerance to the Burmuda grass. These genes can be transferred to cold-season grasses using bioengineering techniques. Gene fragments were originally identified using a cDNA differential Display, by comparing the cDNAs profiles from heat treated 100F (38C) and untreated 77F (25C) leaves. Re-amplification, cloning, and sequence analysis of these fragments have identified 100 partial gene sequences. To confirm the heat-induction of these genes, a dot-blot was conducted. For the dot-blot procedure, the probes were labeled using the Amino Allyl MessageAmp II aRNA Amplification Kit (Ambion, Texas). The aRNA was used to couple with the fluorescent cyanine Dye Cy3-dCTP and Cy5-dCTP (Amersham Biosciences) and hybridize with the PCR-amplified gene sequences. The hybridization signals were obtained by scanning the membrane on a FMBIOIII at the respective channels. Through this study, we have identified some heat-inducible genes and also established a procedure for non-radioactive dot blot analysis.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - Tennessee State University, Department of Biology
2 - Tennessee State University, Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Research
3 - Tennessee State University, Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Research, 3500 John A Merritt Blvd, Nashville, TN, 37209, USA

Keywords:
heat stress.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P08020
Abstract ID:1630


Copyright 2000-2007, Botanical Society of America. All rights