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Abstract Detail


Salinity

Chen, Zhen [1], Li, Yan [1], Xia, Huijun [1].

Arabidopsis Inositol Polyphosphate 6-/3-Kinase Gene (AtIpk2ß) Enhances Salt Resistance via Ionic and ABA Pathways.

Abiotic stresses especially salt severely affect plant productivity. Adverse effect of salinity on plant growth is mainly due to ion toxicity and osmotic stress. We previously identified an inositol polyphosphate 6-/3-kinase gene (AtIpk2ß) from Arabidopsis. However, a little is known about its physiological functions in higher plants. Here we report that AtIpk2ß enhances salt resistance via ionic and ABA pathways. AtIpk2ß was induced by NaCl and ABA. Using root bending assay, we found its T-DNA insertion line exhibited increased sensitivity to NaCl. Meanwhile, AtIpk2ß overexpression lines were resistant to NaCl. Furthermore, the mutant lines were also sensitive to some ions. We also found that the stomata of mutant lines were insensitive to ABA-induced closing. However, the overexpression lines displayed opposite phenotypes to the mutant. RT-PCR experiments showed increased expression of some stress-responsive genes in the mutant lines and decreased expression in overexprssion lines. Further studies need to be done to elucidate the mechanism of AtIpk2ß in salt resistance.


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1 - Key Laboratory of MOE for Plant Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, 430072, P.R.China

Keywords:
AtIpk2
salt
Ion
ABA
Arabidopsis.

Presentation Type: Plant Biology Abstract
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P07013
Abstract ID:1621


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