Unable to connect to database - 08:12:42 Unable to connect to database - 08:12:42 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 08:12:42 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 08:12:42 Botany & Plant Biology 2007 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 08:12:42 Unable to connect to database - 08:12:42 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 08:12:42

Abstract Detail


Ecological Section

Giordano, James [1], Marsico, Travis [2], Hellmann, Jessica J. [1].

Growth Comparison of Three Lomatium Species under Increased Temperature and CO2.

Human activities are increasing atmospheric concentration of CO2, resulting in rising mean temperatures. To understand the future of biodiversity in this changed atmosphere and climate, we must understand how plants are altered by the combined effect of elevated atmospheric carbon and elevated temperature. Further, we must generalize from a few studied species to plant processes in general. To achieve these goals, this study measures seedling growth of three Lomatium species that vary in relative abundance where they occur in western North America. Starting from seed, individuals of all three species were grown in growth chambers under four treatments: 1) ambient CO2 (approximately 400 ppm) and ambient temperature (average daily spring temperatures from Salem, Oregon); 2) ambient CO2 and elevated temperature (+4oC); 3) elevated CO2 (800ppm) and ambient temperature; 4) elevated CO2 and elevated temperature. A sample of plants from each species and treatment were removed weekly and measured for root width and length, wet and dry biomass, number of leaves, and loss of cotyledons. Preliminary results suggest that plants grown under both elevated CO2 and elevated temperature show the fastest development times and the largest biomass, indicating that they effectively take up the additional carbon. Results between plants under ambient CO2 and elevated temperature as compared to elevated CO2 and ambient temperature are similar. In these treatments, the development patterns were faster and biomass was greater than the ambient control but slower and less than the plants grown under both elevated conditions. Plants grown under ambient temperature and ambient CO2 developed most slowly and had the smallest biomass. At least two species appear to respond similarly to the treatments, indicating that members of the genus Lomatium may respond similarly to changing conditions. Thus, in this study system, differences among speciesí abundance may not correlate with responses to climate change.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - University of Notre Dame, Department of Biological Sciences, Galvin Life Sciences, Notre Dame, Indiana, 46556, USA
2 - University of Notre Dame, Department of Biological Sciences, Galvin Life Sciences 107, Notre Dame, Indiana, 46556, USA

Keywords:
Apiaceae
Lomatium
climate change
seed germination
seedling growth
Elevated CO2.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P49020
Abstract ID:1576


Copyright © 2000-2007, Botanical Society of America. All rights