Unable to connect to database - 05:34:49 Unable to connect to database - 05:34:49 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 05:34:49 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 05:34:49 Botany & Plant Biology 2007 - Abstract Search
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Abstract Detail


Conservation Biology

Badtke, Laura [1], Linscott, Todd [2], Koontz, Jason [1].

Using AFLPs for Genetic analyses of the rare Oconee Bell (Shortia galacifolia).

Shortia galacifolia T. & G. (Diapensiaceae; Oconee Bell) is endemic to a narrow mountainous region of the Carolinas (five counties total) in the eastern United States. The other species of Shortia are Asian. First collected in 1787, Asa Gray spent almost 40 years trying to find the type locality and additional populations with no success. Historically, the largest concentration of S. galacifolia and its possible center of distribution were considered to be the confluence of the Horsepasture and Toxaway rivers, with the greatest abundance found in the Jocassee Valley of South Carolina. The creation of the Keowee and Jocassee reservoirs in the mid-1970s eliminated an estimated 60% of S. galacifolia populations. Today, the areas around these new lakes have become even more developed, further threatening the remaining populations. We present the results of an initial survey using hyper-variable AFLP makers to determine the number of clones within a population which will help guide future field sampling and genetic diversity studies for developing conservation management strategies for this species.


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1 - Augustana College, Department of Biology, 639 38th Street, Rock Island, Illinois, 61201, USA
2 - Black Hawk College, Division of Natural Sciences and Engineering, 6600-34th Ave, Moline, IL, 61265, USA

Keywords:
Shortia
Diapensiaceae
AFLP
South Carolina.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: CP02
Location: PDR 4/Hilton
Date: Monday, July 9th, 2007
Time: 9:00 AM
Number: CP02005
Abstract ID:1559


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