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Abstract Detail


Systematics Section / ASPT

Brokaw, Joshua [1], Hufford, Larry [1].

Edaphic Specialization in the Narrow Endemics Mentzelia mollis and Mentzelia packardiae.

Mentzelia mollis and M. packardiae are narrow endemics found on unusual substrates in the northern Great Basin. These substrates have been found to support a large number of rare endemics while excluding common components of surrounding vegetation. Previous work has presented contrasting hypotheses to explain factors contributing to the distributions of these two species. Broad assays of substrate chemical and physical properties reveal extremely high concentrations of sodium and potassium salts. Confusion regarding the edaphic specializations in these taxa may be due to high variation in potassium and sodium levels between sites and temporal variation in area covered by populations. Comparisons of habitat data for M. mollis and M. packardiae indicate significant ecological divergence from other members of section Trachyphytum. Despite geographic proximity and ecological and morphological similarities, phylogeny reconstruction using plastid intergenic spacers suggests independent origins of these species and potentially contrasting evolutionary mechanisms underlying habitat specialization.


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1 - Washington State University, School of Biological Sciences, Po Box 644236, Pullman, Washington, 99164-4236, USA

Keywords:
Mentzelia
edaphic specialization
phylogeny
evolutionary ecology.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P59051
Abstract ID:1289


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