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Abstract Detail


Phycological Section

Robertson, Tanya L. [1], Kozlowski, John [1], Lauria, Catherine H. [1], Cohen, Michael F. [1].

Integrated use of algae and hydrophytes for wastewater treatment and as feedstocks for methane production.

Current methods of treating wastewater from dairies and municipalities often result in effluent containing nutrient concentrations that exceed regulatory limits for discharge into natural waterways. Algae and hydrophytes represent under utilized resources for scrubbing nutrients and other contaminants from the water prior to release. In addition, biogas produced from anaerobic digestion of accumulated biomass can be harnessed for energy. We found that passage of municipal wastewater effluent through a three-tiered cultivation module containing Oedogonium-dominated periphyton removed substantial levels of nitrate, phosphate and metals. In laboratory batch reactors, maximal rates of biogas production from anaerobic digestion of ground periphyton were approximately twice that of cow manure on a dry weight equivalent basis. We are continuing investigations into maximizing methane production from harvested algal mats and aquatic plant feedstocks, including Azolla filiculoides, Elodea canadensis, and various Lemnaceae, individually and in combination with manure.


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1 - Sonoma State University, Biology, 1801 East Cotati Avenue, Rohnert Park, California, 94928, U.S.A.

Keywords:
algae
Wastewater
methane
bioenergy crops.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P55001
Abstract ID:1204


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