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Abstract Detail


Biomechanics

Canales, Keren [1], Davila, Eva [2].

What's in Droseras' diet?

Drosera capillaris Poir. is one of five species of carnivorous plants in Puerto Rico. Itís also found in North America, Greater Antilles, Central America, Trinidad, and British Guiana. Our objective was to know what was Drosera¬īs diet and how diverse would it be. Our study site was at Tortuguero Lagoon Reserve, north of Puerto Rico. This is a subtropical moist secondary forest with siliceous sands. The microhabitat of Drosera capillaris was characterized: soil was physically and chemically analyzed, and data on climate was recorded. This soil is poor in macronutrients; nitrogen, phosphorus, and micronutrients like magnesium, and manganese as well. We observed the plants and collected some of the insects that were trapped by the plants. They were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and observed under a microscope to be classified. Five families of insects have been classified: 2 species of long-legged flies (Diptera: Dolichopodidae), a beetle (Coleoptera: Lathrididae), dark-winged fungus gnat (Diptera: Sciaridae), pygmy mole cricket (Orthoptera: Tridactulidae) and crane flies (Diptera, Tupulidae). The diet seems diverse although most of the insects found are long-legged flies. Insects are very small, ranging from 1 mm to 4 mm.


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1 - Parque Ecuestre, G-50 Galleguito Street, Carolina, PR, 00987
2 - Hc 33 Box 5818, Dorado, PR, 00646, Puerto Rico

Keywords:
none specified

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P
Location: Exhibit Hall (Northeast, Southwest & Southeast)/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: P63001
Abstract ID:1159


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