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Abstract Detail


Supporting Effective Teaching and Learning

Barkworth, Mary [1].

Using the taxonomy of educational objectives to inform the teaching of botany.

In 1956, Bloom published a taxonomy of educational objectives that ranked different kinds of cognitive learning, from straight recall to analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. Research since 1956 has led to some revision of his ideas, but the basic principle and approach can aid us in designing and evaluating all aspects of the courses we teach. Participants will start by discussing sample outlines, lectures, and tests in terms of the kinds of learning they appear designed to encourage, after which there will be a general discussion of integrating the objectives into a statement of one’s teaching philosophy. The last half of the workshop will be devoted to developing, or modifying, objectives and activities for the courses taught by the participants. For this portion, those attending are encouraged to bring their own course outlines, lecture notes, and tests. Tests are important. Students are pragmatists; most students use our tests as an indication of what we regard as important in what we teach. It is, therefore, important that they reflect our educational objectives.


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Related Links:
Description of Bloom's taxonomy


1 - Utah State University, Intermountain Herbarium, Dept. of Biology, 5305 Old Main Hill, Logan, Utah, 84322, USA

Keywords:
learning objectives
teaching philosophy
course design.

Presentation Type: Workshop
Session: W15
Location: Lake Erie/Hilton
Date: Sunday, July 8th, 2007
Time: 8:00 AM
Number: W15001
Abstract ID:1026


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